84th Annual Hopi Festival of Arts & Culture

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Festival: Saturday & Sunday, July 1 & 2, 2017, 9 am-5 pm

A Fourth of July tradition since the 1930s, the Hopi Festival of Arts & Culture features 90 award-winning artists and presenters from the Hopi villages in northern Arizona. Buy traditional and contemporary art and enjoy Heritage Insights lectures, artist demonstrations, and performances by the Hopi Sinom Dancers, Tyrone & The Ledge, Tha 'Yoties, and flutist Fredrick Andrews.

With support from: Arizona Commission on the Arts, AZ Humanities, City of Flagstaff/BBB Revenues and Flagstaff Arts, Mark Sublette Medicine Man Gallery and Tsakurshovi Hopi Arts & Crafts.

Weekend Pass: $18 adult, $12 youth/student/American Indian
Daily Admission: $12 adult; $8 youth (10-17), student (with ID) & American Indian (with tribal affiliation)
Free for MNA members & Children under 10

Exclusive Member Preview: Friday, June 30, 2017, 6-8 pm
Free with Membership
Member Guests $5, Plateau Society Guests free
6 pm: Remarks, Delbridge Honanie Tribute & Juried Art Competition Award Ceremony
6:20 pm: Booths Open

Mainstage Performances
10 am Freedom Songs with Ed Kabotie (Saturday Only)
Freedom Songs with Ed Kabotie will address the concept of freedom from an indigenous perspective, highlighting the Pueblo Revolt, Hopi imprisonments at the close of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries, and how the face off at Standing Rock echoes issues on the Colorado Plateau.

10 am Reggae Inna Hopiland with Ed Kabotie (Sunday Only)
Museum Artist-in-Residence, Ed Kabotie, will perform music and speak on the unique popularity of reggae music in the Hopi culture. Beginning with a personal journey of musical influences, both traditional and contemporary, this presentation will highlight the Hopi’s, and other Colorado Plateau tribes’, deep connection to this musical genre.

11:15 am Hopi Sinom Dancers

12:45 pm Tyrone & The Ledge
Fronted by Hopi-Hualapai musician Tryone Duwyenie, this ensemble plays music inspired by their Native American heritage with a rock sound.

1:30 pm Flutist Fredrick Andrews

2:30 pm Hopi Sinom Dancers (Saturday Only)

2:30 pm Tha 'Yoties (Sunday Only)

3:30 pm Tryone & The Ledge

 

Heritage Insights Lecture Series
Supported by Arizona Humanities

Saturday
10:45 am Hopi Code Talkers Part I
Journalist Patty Talahongva will discuss the lives and experiences of the Hopi men who served in World War II with distinction and devised a code using their native language to relay military messages during the war. Using words like eggs to denote bombs and a duck to describe a ship, the code was confusing even to other Hopi speakers and so intricate it was never broken by the enemy. Talahongva will also talk about how the government boarding school legacy also shaped the military service of American Indians.

12 pm Hopi Resources: A Non-Profit Perspective
This panel discussion moderated by Susan Sekaquaptewa. Join Red Feather Development Group, the Hopi Foundation, the Hopi Education Endowment Fund, and Hopitutuqaiki for an engaging discussion on how these nonprofits are providing assistance to the Hopi during this changing and challenging social and economic climate.

1 pm Hopi Running
Join Patty Talahongva as she talks about the storied history of running among the Hopi people. Perhaps the most well-known runner is Louis Tewanima who competed in two Olympics. Tewanima had been forced to attend the government boarding school, Carlisle Indian School, in Pennsylvania. His running ability caught the eye of the coach, Pop Warner. Tewanima competed in the 1908 games and then again in the 1912 games, bringing home the Silver Medal in the 10,000 meter race. Today the boys cross country team at Hopi High School hold the country’s record for the most consecutive state championships, 27! Running was and is an act of prayer. Today in the villages various runs are still held that are part of ceremonies. Clan runs are popular as well at the elementary schools. Come learn about the history of running at Hopi.

2 pm The Legacy of Fred Kabotie
Museum Artist-in-Residence Ed Kabotie discusses the life and achievements of his grandfather, celebrated artist Fred Kabotie. Fred Kabotie was an award-winning painter and silversmith as well as a potter, author, curator and educator. Known for his collaborative work with famed architect Mary Colter, Kabotie painted the murals at Colter's Desertview Watchtower at Grand Canyon National Park, the artist worked tirelessly throughout his life to preserve Hopi culture.

3 pm Traditional Hopi Pottery Part 1
Dorothy and Emerson Ami are renowned potters from the Hopi village of Polacca in northern Arizona who lead workshops at the Museum as well as throughout the Southwest. Through photographs and video, the Amis will share and discuss the process of creating traditional Hopi pottery as well as Hopi history and cultural traditions. This two-part presentation will foster understanding and appreciation of this labor-intensive process that includes selecting clay and processing, hand coiling, rock polishing, and outdoor firing.

Sunday
10:45 am Hopi Code Talkers Part II
In part II off this presentation, Hopi journalist Patty Talahongva will share two mini documentaries she has produced: “Song of the Hopi,” featuring the veterans gathered, decades after the war, to raise the flag at an elementary school event and reminisce on their service and “Native Words, Native Warriors,” produced for the National Museum of the American Indian as part of a traveling exhibit and featuring interviews with Code Talkers from the Hopi, Navajo, Comanche and Meskwaki tribes. A Q & A will follow each screening.

12 pm Hopi Running: Part II
Each year during the Labor Day weekend the descendants of Hopi Olympian, Louis Tewanima, hold a 10k race in his honor. The annual race has runners from all over the world come to run the Hopi mesas to test their endurance and stimulate the mind and spirit.  The 10K and 5K trails run on flat, level trails as well as steep mesa trails with beautiful panoramic views, being cheered on by spectators as they watch from the top of the mesa.  The winners of the race are awarded traditional Hopi baskets and jewelry made by local artists.  Experience the thrill of completing one of the toughest races in Arizona (which also made the AZ Republic’s Top Ten adventures to do in 2015).  Join Sam Taylor, president of the Louis Tewanima Footrace organization to hear more about this special event. Patty Talahongva will also share a segment of her documentary, “Song of the Hopi,” which shows the annual Tewanima Footrace.

1 pm Hopi Jewelry
Award-winning silversmith Gerald Lomaventema and his students discuss how they are carrying on the tradition of this beautiful and uniquely Hopi art form.

2 pm Sikyatki Revival & Modern Hopi Pottery
Museum of Northern Arizona Curator of Anthropology, Dr. Kelley Hays-Gilpin, and award-winning Hopi potter Bobby Silas explore revivals of ancient design styles and pottery technologies from archaeological contexts.

3 pm Traditional Hopi Pottery Part II
Dorothy and Emerson Ami are renowned potters from the Hopi village of Polacca in northern Arizona who lead workshops at the Museum as well as throughout the Southwest. Through photographs and video, the Amis will share and discuss the process of creating traditional Hopi pottery as well as Hopi history and cultural traditions. This two-part presentation will foster understanding and appreciation of this labor-intensive process that includes selecting clay and processing, hand coiling, rock polishing, and outdoor firing.

 

Participating Artists

Dorothy Ami (Pottery)
Emerson Ami (Pottery)
Fedrick Andrews (Hopi Flutes)
Renee Archambeau (Pottery)
Ivern Beatty (Fine Art)
Yolanda Bydonie (Textiles/Jewelry)
Ramon Dalangyawma (Jewelry)
Alice Dashee (Pottery)
Melanie David (Textiles)
Tim Edaakie
Dorleen Gashweseoma (Basketry)
Ryan Gashweseoma (Kachina Dolls)
Wally Grover (Carvings)
Fermin Hawee (Jewelry)
Jonah Hill (Jewelry)
Kara Honanie
Jerolyn Honwytewa (Jewelry)
Iva Honyestewa (Baskets)
Akema Honyumptewa (Textiles)
Marie Honyumptewa (Folk Art)
Marlon L. Huma (Carvings)
Lomayumtewa Ishii (Painting)
Darlene James (Pottery)
Michael Jenkins (Kachina Dolls)
Ed Kabotie (Fine Art)
Eric Kayquaptewa (Kachina Dolls)
Wilmetta Kayquoptewa (Folk Art)
Horace Kayquoptewa (Carvings/Glass)
Anderson Koinva (Jewelry)
Duane Koyawena (Fine Arts)
Darrin Kuwanhongva (Overlay/Silver Coin)
David Lalo (Textiles)
Gene Lalo (Kachina Dolls)

Valjean Lalo (Textiles)
Jessica Lomatewama (Basketry)
Justin Lomatewama (Kachina Dolls)
Gerald Lomaventema (Jewelry)
Garrett A. Maho (Pottery)
Joe Maktima
Duane Maktima (Jewelry)
Lawrence Melendez (Kachina Dolls)
Merle Namoki (Jewelry)
Bryan Nasetoynwa (Kachina Dolls)
Curtis Naseyowma (Kachina Dolls)
Emmett Navakuku (Jewelry/Fine Arts)
Bryson Nequatewa (Carving/Glass)
Dal Suhu "Not-Afraid" (Carving)
Kevin Horace Quannie
Gerry Quotskuyva (Carving/Sculpture)
Cordell Sakeva (Overlay/Silver Coin)
Daryl Sakeva (Ceramics/Katchinas)
Wendell Sakiestewa (Fashion)
Weaver Selina (Jewelry)
Alberta Selina (Basketry)
Gwen Setalla (Pottery)
Howard Sice (Jewelry)
Bobby Silas (Pottery)
Carliss Sinquah (Painting)
Gayland Spencer (Pottery)
Delwyn Takala (Overlay/Silver coin)
Yvette Talaswaima (Jewelry)
Duane Tawahongva (Jewelry)
Buddy Tubinaghtewa
Kathleen Wheeler (Painting)