Rock Art Studies Bibliographic Database

. . . an incredibly useful, valuable, and effective resource for the 9,000 or so rock art researchers of the world.  
-Robert Bednarik, Convener of the International Federation of Rock Art Organizations

The Rock Art Studies Bibliographic Database compiles literature about rock art into a searchable, online bibliography, providing free access to more than 40,000 citations.
The database began in 1993 as a tool for organizing the Compiler’s personal library of more than 130 shelf feet pertaining to the world’s rock art heritage. As the project grew, citations were added from scores of other sources, including: bibliographies, research archives, library catalogues, on-line search engines and other private holdings. The sources are notated in the “library” field of the database, and are detailed in the Key to Sources for Citations.
The database became available online in 2003 through a joint partnership between the Bay Area Rock Art Research Association and the Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley. Since 2016 the database has been affiliated with the Museum of Northern Arizona.

E-mail additions, corrections and comments to:

Leigh Marymor, Compiler

More

How to Cite

Marymor, Leigh (Compiler), [current year], Rock Art Studies: A Bibliographic Database, https://musnaz.org/search_rock_art_studies_db/ (Accessed dd/mm/yyyy), Museum of Northern Arizona, Flagstaff

BARARA

Established in 1983, the Bay Area Rock Art Research Association is an avocational group of professionals and amateur enthusiasts who share a dedication to rock art conservation, research and education in the Greater San Francisco Bay Area and Northern California. BARARA publishes a newsletter and organizes visits to rock art sites and other rock art conservation activities.

Learn More

Acknowledgements

We thank the following people for their invaluable help: Bob Marks and Evelyn Billo of Rupestrian Cyberservices; Theresa Salazar, Curator of Western American at the Bancroft Library; Lynne Grigsby of the Bancroft; Kelley Hays-Gilpin at Museum of Northern Arizona; Amy Marymor; and the many database users whose contributions have been critical to the project’s success.