68th Annual Navajo Festival of Arts & Culture

Member Preview: Friday, August 4, 2017, 6-8 pm
Festival: Saturday & Sunday, August 5 & 6, 2017, 9 am-5 pm

Spend your weekend in the cool pines and immerse yourself in the artistry and cultural traditions of more than 80 award-winning Navajo artists. Buy traditional and contemporary art and enjoy artist demonstrations, authentic food, insightful heritage programs, and a variety of Navajo performances.

Weekend Pass: $18 adult, $12 youth/student/American Indian
Daily Admission: $12 adult; $8 youth (10-17), student (w/ ID) & American Indian (w/ tribal card)
Free for Museum members & children under 10

Mainstage Performances

10 am  Pollen Trail Dancers
These talented troupe performs authentic dances traditionally featured at powwows. Dances include story-telling performances such as the Bow & Arrow Dance which tells the story of Navajo hunting days and the Basket Dance which demonstrates the importance of baskets and basket-weaving in Navajo life. They also perform fast-paced, crowd-pleasing Hoop Dances.

11:30 am  Sweethearts of Navajo
The Sweethearts of Navajoland, who’s most recent release features Lillian Ashley, Lena Hardy and Roberta Wilson, have been creating music inspired by their love of Navajo culture for over 33 years. 

1 pm  Jones Benally Family
Guided by world-champion hoop dancer and Arizona Living Legend Jones Benally, this family has entertained audiences worldwide with a repertoire of over two dozen Navajo and Inter-Tribal dances.

2:30 pm  Blackkiss
Blackkiss was founded by Pete Sands, who grew up listening to Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, and Willie Nelson while also learning the music of his culture.  These are the roots that inspire the artist's gritty and bare-boned country music.  Blackkiss has toured throughout the Southwest, attracting thousands of fans with their desert sound.

3:30 pm  Pollen Trail Dancers
These talented troupe performs authentic dances traditionally featured at powwows. Dances include story-telling performances such as the Bow & Arrow Dance which tells the story of Navajo hunting days and the Basket Dance which demonstrates the importance of baskets and basket-weaving in Navajo life. They also perform fast-paced, crowd-pleasing Hoop Dances.

 

Heritage Insights Lecture Series
Supported by Arizona Humanities

Saturday
10:45 am  Aaron White

Award-winning Artist/Singer/Songwriter, Grammy nominated musician Aaron White has been entertaining audiences for over 20 years. His intersection of Native American Flute, Acoustic Guitar with World Music overtones awaken the inner soul of those who hear his music. Two worlds influence is his sound: the Traditional way of Native America along with modern music. There is always something fresh and new with the music Aaron White creates.

12:15 pm The Long Walk of the Navajo People, 1864-1868 with Dr. Evangeline Parsons Yazzie
In 1864, Navajo people were forced to walk over 450 miles to Fort Sumner in eastern New Mexico.  Imprisoned on a 40-square mile reservation for four long years the people suffered from hunger, loneliness, illnesses, and severe environmental conditions. On June 1, 1868, U.S. officials and Navajo leaders reached an agreement, allowing the Navajos to return to a portion of their original lands located in northeastern Arizona and northwestern New Mexico. The Long Walk has been collected in historical literature by non-Navajo authors.  Absent from the literature is the Navajo perspective. The audience will hear the Navajo elders’ version of the Long Walk in this presentation.

2 pm  Film Screening: Art of the People

3 pm  Traditional Navajo Weaving with Marilou Schultz
Marilou Schultz will be presenting a brief history of the Navajo Rugs with some examples of the different phases, the process of making (wool preparation, spinning, & dyeing) and weaving a rug, and where weaving is today.

 

Sunday
10:45 am  Aaron White

Award-winning Artist/Singer/Songwriter, Grammy nominated musician Aaron White has been entertaining audiences for over 20 years. His intersection of Native American Flute, Acoustic Guitar with World Music overtones awaken the inner soul of those who hear his music. Two worlds influence is his sound: the Traditional way of Native America along with modern music. There is always something fresh and new with the music Aaron White creates.

12:15 pm Boarded Up: Social and Historical Interpretations of the American Indian Boarding School Era with Dr. Evangeline Parsons Yazzie
This presentation will impart a social interpretation of how life among Indian Nations began to change due to the plight American Indian people were forced into in the name of education.  American Indians are the only ethnic group in the U.S. who were subjected to forced education by the federal government for generations. Children were taken by force, placed in a boarding school, kept there for several years, and were not allowed to speak their language or practice their culture. Parents were forced to sever all contact with their children while the children were forced into a hostile environment and expected to thrive and learn. The presentation is from an American Indian perspective and will include the experiences of other community members.

2 pm  Film Screening: Art of the People

3 pm  Traditional Navajo Weaving with Marilou Schultz
Marilou Schultz will be presenting a brief history of the Navajo Rugs with some examples of the different phases, the process of making (wool preparation, spinning, & dyeing) and weaving a rug, and where weaving is today.

 

Food Vendors
Archuleta's
Arizona Roasting Company
Grandma's Navajo Fry Bread

Participating Artists

Al Bahe (Fine Arts)

Abraham Begay (Jewelry)

Evelyn M. Begay (Jewelry)

Leroy Begay (Jewelry)

Nelson Begay

Rudy Begay (Fine Art)

Sue Begay (Weaving)

Sylvia C. Begaye (Folk Art)

Ernest Benally

Harry Benally (Tree Carving/Jewelry)

Kimberly Benally (Pottery)

Veronica Benally

Eunice Bennett

Sally Black (Basketry)

Beverly Blacksheep (Fine Art)

Refina Canyon (Jewelry)

Rena Charles (Jewelry)

Frank Chee (Jewelry)

Evelyn Chee (Jewelry)

Eugene A. Crawford (Textiles)

Vivian Descheney (Weaving)

Phyllis Etcitty (Jewelry)

Jimmie Harrison (Jewelry)

Lorraine Herder (Textiles/Foods/Beadwork)

Amelia Joe-Chandler (Jewelry)

Alphonso John (Jewelry)

David K. John (Fine Arts)

Hadiibah A. John (Fine Arts)

Kelvis Josh (Jewelry)

Cristoff Keyonnie

Julius Keyonnie (Jewelry)

Georgia Kieyoomia (Jewelry)

Yolanda Lamone (Pottery)

Mona Laughing (Textiles)

Erecka Lee (Jewelry)

Nathan Lefthand (Jewelry)

Nelson Lewis (Fine Art)

Timm Lewis (Jewelry)

Andy Marion (Jewelry)

Toney Mitchell (Jewelry)

Jeanette Monte (Jewelry)

Rick Monte (Jewelry)

Albert Nells (Jewelry)

Jimmy Nelson (Jewelry/Beadwork)

Sidney Nez Jr. (Jewelry)

Virgil Nez (Fine Art)

Cameron Olivas (Folk Art)

Wendell Sakiestewa (Fashion)

Marilou Schultz (Textiles)

Gilmore Scott (Fine Art)

Laura Shurley-Olivas (Fashion)

Lyle Secatero (Jewelry)

Michelle Silver (Textile/Fashion)

Edith Simonson

Jeremy Singer (Fine Art)

Michelle Tsosie Sisneros (Fine Art)

Samuel Slater (Jewelry)

Harold Stevens, Jr. (Jewelry)

Marcella Teller (Jewelry)

Tracy Tohannie (Painting)

Mary L. Tom (Jewelry

Marlene Walters (Fine Art)

Roy Walters (Fine Art)

Delia Wauneka (Jewelry)

Bahe Whitethorne Jr. (Fine Art)

Bahe Whitethorne Sr. (Fine Art)

Elizabeth Whitethorne-Benally (Fine Art/Folk Art)

Heather Williams (Textiles)

Randall J. Wilson (Fine Art)

Merlin Yazzie (Painting)

Peterson Yazzie (Painting/Sculpture)

Pat Yellowhorse (Jewelry)